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The 100%, artist run non-profit art book publishing company.

 Biophilia

Curious Magazine Issue No.3

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Artwork by Todd Molinari

Artwork by Todd Molinari

Inside the Biophilia Issue

What is Biophilia?

The biophilia hypothesis also called BET suggests that humans possess an innate tendency to seek connections with nature and other forms of life.

The term “biophilia” means “love of life or living systems.” It was first used by Erich Fromm to describe a psychological orientation of being attracted to all that is alive and vital. Unlike phobias, which are the aversions and fears that people have of things in their environment, philias are the attractions and positive feelings that people have toward organisms, species, habitats, processes and objects in their natural surroundings.

Revenge

Curious Magazine Issue No.2

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Inside the Revenge Issue:

Throughout history, artists have gone through great lengths to create colorful scenes of epic tales of revenge. What lives within us that drives us to share our stories of deceit, betrayal, torment, pain, revenge, and justice? In this issue, visual artists, musicians and writers have captured the curious complexities that define revenge. Whether one is the victim of an act of revenge, or the one seeking and plotting an act of revenge, a range of human emotion reveals itself. Throughout you will find themes or gender identity, class, sexuality, pettiness, jealousy and power.

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An Interview with Plasmic

I’m hella queer, and although I don’t write love songs, my song Baby Machine is about feeling pressured into heteronormativity. I try to write my feminist songs intersectional. It’s important to remember not all women have the same parts and acknowledge trans men’s experiences too. Read More

 

Millennial Pink

Issue No.1

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Inside the Millennial Pink Issue:

From IKEA trinkets to music video backdrops, makeup brand logos to fine art, a certain set of hues of pink have become essential to portraying the current aesthetic. It is so prevalent in fact, that the term “Millennial Pink” has been coined as the popular nickname for this salmon-y, peachy, pulpy, soft pink that we seem to find everywhere. What makes this hue so appealing to the masses?